Denver, Colorado Territory Wagon Sales & Repair Journal, 1867-1870: An Annotated Index

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It appears that this merchant sold and repaired mostly Schuttler and Bain wagons that were brought in as far as they could by rail, most probably to the Cheyenne station, then driven to Denver by drayage companies. Among the items often repaired were yokes, rakes, tongues, boxes, bows, seatbacks and covers for the wagons.

The book includes accounts of a more personal nature as well, such as clothing he had on hand, including a fine black suit, a heavy beaver overcoat and a pair of Buffalo overshoes. Among the personal items he had on hand on 1 Jan 1868, were a watch and chain, gold and silver specimens, field glasses, Indian trinkets, a photograph album, four mountain scenes, an 8 inch Colt revolver and a pocket Derringer. On 31 December 1867, he subscribed to the Rocky Mountain News for $7.00, and lists his books, including a 2 Volume set of the Library of Mesmerism, Mines of Colorado, a Hand Book for Home Improvement, Esop’s [sic] Fables, Mayhew’s Book Keeping, a township map of Pennsylvania, and the History and Directory of Denver.

At some point, the book was given to most probably a daughter to use as a scrapbook of sorts, where she filled the first 30 or so pages with articles about homemaking, including a recipe for waterproof glue (adapted for Colorado), and advice such as that for “making sleeves of a different material for the dress as the effect is particularly good on women who are inclined to stoutness.”

Denver, Colorado Territory Wagon Sales & Repair Journal, 1867-1870: An Annotated Index

Colorado Territorial Penitentiary, Board of Managers Reports, 1871-1877: An Annotated Index of Marshals, Wardens, Guards, Board Members, Prisoners, and Local Businesses

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The Colorado Territorial Penitentiary, Board of Managers Reports, 1871-1877: An Annotated Index of Marshals, Wardens, Guards, Board Members, Prisoners, and Local Businesses contains the names of the penitentiary’s first one hundred prisoners (including escapees), a physical description of the person, why they were in the penitentiary, which county sentenced them and where they were born.

In addition, the Board of Managers Reports included the services provided to the prison by local businesses, the names of each member of the Board, along with the names of US Marshals, wardens, guards, nurses and other personnel.

An inventory dated 1 Dec 1874 shows a prison (40’x70’), a guard’s sleeping apartment, a guard’s dining room and prison kitchen, the warden’s residence (brick, 6 rooms and hall, one outhouse and store house), a shoemaker’s shop (adobe with cellar), a carpenter’s show (wood 15’x20’), a blacksmith’s shop (wood 14’x17’), a stone cutter’s shop (wood, 15’x32’), two outhouses for general use, a bake oven (10’x12’), 360’ of stone embankment in front of the prison, 330’ of picket fence with 2 single gates and 1 double gate, 700’ of board fence around the garden, all on 40 acres of land.

Colorado Territorial Penitentiary, Board of Managers Reports, 1871-1877